Why Choose Criminal Law?

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Introduction:

Criminal law is the most practice and known area in the subjects of Law. But at the same time, it is complicated and confusing also. Criminal law deals with the motoring offenses and murder, to white color crimes like corruption or fraud, nuisances, and torts.

If you were a fan of detective or investigator characters from television shows like ‘True Detective’, ‘CSI: Crime Scene Investigation’, ‘And Sherlock Holmes, or ‘How to get away with murder, what intrigued you most about the characters? How would you like to live your life as they do? Your only choice is to study Criminal Law or Criminology. A major part of your job will be to solve, understand, and prevent crimes.

Why Choose Criminal Law?
Why Choose Criminal Law?

Criminal Law v/s Criminology

The two disciplines are concerned with criminals and crimes, but they focus on different aspects. Understanding the differences between degrees and careers is important before choosing one.

Criminal law refers to the laws and codes that deal directly with criminal offenses, penalties, prosecutions, and trials. It aims to answer this question, which is: did the suspect break the law, if so, what was the consequence, and what punishment would they receive if found guilty?. In your Law school, you’ll study subjects like Indian Penal Code, Criminal Procedure Code, Criminal Jurisprudence, Evidence Act, etc. in order to understand the criminal law per se.

The goal of criminology is to understand the behaviors of criminals and find ways to prevent future crimes by analyzing their crimes and criminals. Crime trends are also examined, as well as how crimes affect society. Criminology also emphasizes the evaluation of punishment and rehabilitation methods to determine if they are effective and how to improve them.

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What is the difference between Civil Law and Criminal Law?

Civil Law is between two contracting parties which can be individuals and organizations and on the breach of that contract, parties file suit against each other and the main aim was to compensation or an agreement related to finances.

In contrast, Criminal law cases are against the state not against the particular individual. This law’s primary aim is to keep society and the justice system stable. In this law, there are punishments, and sometimes compensations also.

Why Choose Criminal Law?

This field of law is very interesting and problem-solving, the lawyers in this field have sharp-mind and they know how to interpret the law exactly in that situation.

The specialization of Criminal Law is among the oldest and most popular in law. The completion of an integrated undergraduate degree with Criminal Law as specialization can allow an individual to pursue a postgraduate degree in the subject. This may also enable an individual to begin a career in the field. Candidates with a Criminal Law degree can pursue some popular law job profiles, including:

Criminal Lawyer: Cross-examining witnesses and justifying why the court should give the client a judgment is part of this job profile. Lawyers who specialize in criminal law conduct research, analyze cases, then present their findings in court. In this court, his court, they attempt to get their clients freed or negotiate a plea bargain or settlement.

Legal Advisors: A person in this position advises clients on their rights and responsibilities under the law. An attorney usually researches the laws that apply to a particular case and then reviews previous judgments that have been made in cases similar to the one which their client is currently facing, helping them to figure out how to save themselves.

Choosing Crime law as a specialization or career will definitely lead you to great success and opportunities. But to become a successful criminal attorney needs dedication, hard-working, and having plenty of stamina, and loads of persistence.